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So, if you followed Phase One of this tutorial you should have a piece of patch work that is around 48cm x 83cm in size. If you didn’t follow Phase One, go back and do so now 😉

Phase Two is about with actually adding the quilting (to provide the cushioning for your precious tech) and turning the whole thing into a patchwork laptop cosy.

First of all. Here’s a Reminder of the Equipment and Materials that you will need:

Patchwork Laptop Cosy - all the equipment needed for this project
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Patchwork Laptop Cosy - all the materials necessary for this project
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  • 1 Cot Panel or other Patchwork cotton fabric to cover approx. 50cm x 80cm (for a 17″ Laptop) – I used the Petit Fleur.
  • Coordinating fabrics to make patches for spots where the colours do not quite match up.
  • Quilt Batting (I used this Polyester Wadding but decided to use it double thickness)
  • General purpose sewing thread
  • Backing Fabric of your choice – I used a coordinating fabric from the same range. 50cm x 80cm.
  • Coordinating Bias Binding – 3metres
  • Iron On Vinyl ( I used Thermoweb Gloss Heat ‘n’ Bond).
  • 2 x 5cm squares of interfacing in three weights – I used iron on standard medium vilene, peltex 71f fusible one side heavyweight interfacing and a fusible cotton interfacing. Basically any scraps I had left over!

Step Fourteen:

Layout your patchwork on top of your backing fabric.

The patchwork for the laptop cosy laid out on backing fabric ready for marking out
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Beginners do best to avoid using stripes or checks as backing fabrics as they look wonky VERY easily. Click To Tweet

Use an air erasable fabric marker and your quilting ruler to mark out the backing fabric.

Step Fifteen:

Using the quilting ruler and rotary cutter cut out your backing fabric. It’s possible that you may have to join pieces of backing fabric together to make a large enough piece.  As you  can see from my photos, I did!

Remember to press the seam if before carrying on if you do join pieces.

Yet another reason why stripes and checks are not a good idea when you are starting out – hard to match up well!

Step Sixteen:

Place your backing fabric onto your wadding and pin into position.

Start pinning in the middle of the fabric and work outwards toward the edges to avoid either getting wrinkled. Click To Tweet

Use fabric scissors to cut around the wadding and backing sandwich.

Patchwork Laptop Cosy - Cutting the wadding to size ready for quilting
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Step Seventeen:

Put together a sandwich of the layers. The laminated patchwork goes on the top, the wadding in the middle and the backing fabric on the bottom with the wrong side facing the wadding.

Use clips (I used small bulldog clips) to hold the three pieces together. You don’t want to use pins as they will put holes in the laminated patchwork.

I started at the middle and worked towards each end to avoid wrinkles and I positioned the clips on the seams as  these are the spots most likely to shift during quilting.

Patchwork Laptop Cosy - Three layers clipped together for quilting
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Step Eighteen:

Sew across rows “in the ditch”. It’s important to start with the middle row of the piece and work out towards each end. If you don’t know what “in the ditch” means there is a great illustration here.

Patchwork Laptop Cosy - Stitching in the ditch to quilt the laptop cosy
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Some quilters use a special walking foot on their machine to do this but this project is small enough and thin enough that you shouldn’t need to worry about that.

Step Nineteen:

Add your magnetic popper fastening.

I followed this fantastic tutorial from Anna at Noodlehead.  I could not put it any better than she does, so I won’t try!

Patchwork Laptop Cosy - Adding a magnetic popper means this laptop cosy stays securely shut
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I think a magnetic fastener is the best form of fastening for this cosy as it closes securely with minimum of fuss, always handy if you’re on the move.

Patchwork Laptop Cosy - Magnetic Popper for fastening with no fuss
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 Step Twenty:

Next I cut 50mm wide strips of fabric from a co-ordinating fabric and sewed them together into one long strip.  As this cosy wont be put in a washing machine (it would wreck the laminate) I cut the fabric straight and not on the bias.  This is more efficient for not wasting fabric but it would not stretch and give with the item if it was washed.

I pressed the joins in the fabric flat and then used a bias tape maker to turn the strip into binding for the edges of the cosy.

Homemade binding in a co-ordinating fabric adds a special touch to the quilted laptop cosy
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I trimmed the edges so they were straight and not too bulky.  Then used pins to pin one edge of the binding along the top edge of the cosy (the one that would be folded inside the cosy when complete), as you can see in the picture below. As you can see the pins are put into the seams between the patches so as not to create holes in the laminate.

Step Twenty-One:

Sew along the flattened out fold of the binding on the outside (laminated side) of the cosy following the crease of the fold. This should give a seam around 5mm in from the edge of the cosy. You don’t need to worry about making the ends neat as they will be covered.

Using a sewing machine to attach the binding to the edge of the cosy.
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Step Twenty-Two:

I then used the clips again to fold the tape over the top edge and hold it taut (see below).

Using binder clips to fold the binding over the top edge of the cosy.
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Step Twenty-Three:

When you sew the binding into place you sew on the front of the cosy (the laminated side) again. You sew “in the ditch” between the front edge of the binding and the laminated area.  When you folded the binding over there should be sufficient to overlap the area you will be sewing, securing it.

Using the sewing machine to sew along the edge of the folded over binding, securing it.
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Step Twenty-Four:

I folded the piece of quilted fabric into the cosy shape and used the clips to attach the binding to the front of the folded cosy and hold the edges together while I sewed. This time I folded the ends under so that they would give a neat finish.

Use binder clips to hold the edges of the folded cosy together with the binding ready fo sewing.
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Continue this process around the point of the flap and down the other side of the folded piece. and stitch into place.

Step Twenty-Five:

Then use the clips again to fold the binding across to the back and hold into place.

Clipping the binding into position around the edge of the cosy
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Sew again with the back and outside of the flap  facing upwards on the machine and sewing “in the ditch” as you did before. Trim all ends of thread and you should have your completed cosy!

The finished Patchwork Laptop Cosy in use!
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I hope that you find these tutorials easy to follow but if you have any questions just get in touch with me via email or social media and I am happy to help in anyway I can and I would REALLY love to see any of your projects if you feel like sharing.

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